Mountaineering Training in Colorado

We run a range of Trekking and mountaineering courses and winter skills weekends in Colorado. If you are thinking of climbing Island peak, Mera Peak, Mont Blanc, Mount Elbrus, Ama Dablam or any Himalayan peak.  We have designed one, two and three day training courses in Colorado. These courses will help you understand the specific skill set needed to be safe and successful on your chosen adventure. We can also run private individual and group training courses, tailored to your specific needs.

Previous Mountaineering Training

If you are signing up to an an Ian Taylor Trekking trip, we want you, your team mates and our staff to be as safe as possible. We require everyone comes to our International trips with basic mountaineering training. This training needs to be specific and our courses are designed for beginners and advanced climbers preparing for altitude climbs around the world. Each weekend is designed with you in mind,  tailoring the weekend with specific training requirements. See below for further information. Also check out our Winter skills training in Scotland or Polar Training in Norway.

Mountaineering Training in Colorado

Be Prepared for Your Chosen Adventure

We believe mountaineering skills training is critical for your safety and the safety of everyone around you. We want our teams to be professional, safe and successful. So we demand that you understand the basic skills needed for your chosen adventure. We also want you to understand the physicality of operating in a high stress, low oxygen environment. That is why we run these courses in Colorado.

Mountain Training in Colorado

Intro To Mountaineering Skills

Course Goals: To teach students the foundation of mountaineering so that they will have the skills to potentially climb a technical peak or big mountain with skilled partners or in the company of a guide.

1 Person $450 per day
2 People $400 per person, per day
3 People $375 per person, per day
4 People $350 per person, per day

High Alpine course will be coming soon!

Skills Covered

Personal gear selection for mountaineering
Use of crampons and ice axe
Use of ascenders and Self Rescue
Minimum-impact travel techniques
Efficient movement on moderate rock and snow covered terrain
Knots, belaying, simple anchors, and stance management
Risk awareness and avoidance techniques
Technical objective (climbing day)

Course Itinerary

Day 1 -Skills day (Boulder Area) 8am-4pm
Day 2- Climbing day (Boulder Area) 8am-5pm

Day 1 Schedule: Meet in Boulder

7:45am Guide arrives to begin prep for day, coordinate with other guides.
8-8:30am Clients sign acknowledgement of risk, guide reviews medical history and asks any pertinent questions. Introductions and tone setting. Review course curriculum and itinerary for day and weekend and risk management briefing.
8:30-9:00 Check equipment and review clothing and gear selection
9:00-9:30 Travel to site that gives access to easy rock and/or snow, depending on conditions, options include Eldorado Canyon State Park, Boulder Canyon, or Golden area. 10:00am – 4pm Review and practice climbing techniques.  4pm-4:30pm Return to trailhead or parking lot.

Waivers and Gear Up

Set a positive and relaxed tone from the beginning. Ask important questions including health-related as well as the goals they bring into the day.
Everyone must complete an Acknowledgement of Risk Form (waiver).
Complete a gear check with the client’s gear and outfit them with the gear they still need. Pay close attention to warmth of boots and gloves and check packs for extra gear they do not need.

Risk Management Briefing

Review specific cold weather issues, frostbite, dehydration, hypothermia, Altitude sickness, wind and sunburn. Key point is hydration and food intake and how it controls staying warm and how a lack of each contributes to frostbite and hypothermia.
Review symptoms of AMS, HAPE, and HACE plus potential treatments.
Emergency procedures- Where your cell phone is and phone numbers, where keys to the car are at, talk about general plans for retreat. What are the greatest risks we will encounter – falling ice, weather, avalanche

General first aid considerations, blisters, wind burn, lip burn etc. Ask clients about specific medications they are taking and check to make sure students have the general items (sunscreen, lip balm, foot care- generally not necessary for plastics) they will need to take of themselves.
LNT practices specific to the alpine environment

Curriculum
Personal Clothing and Gear Selection
Shells
Insulating layers
Hands, feet, face
Pack types and sizes
Crampon type and fit
Technical ice tools vs. mountaineering ice axe
Features to look for in climbing harness/ proper adjustment
Boot options
Helmet fitting
Demonstrate how to pack a pack and how to stow crampons and ice tools

Food and fluids

Water and food consumption and physiological demands of high altitude
Keeping fluids from freezing
Bars, gels, other snack foods and rehydration fluids

Low impact considerations
Human waste
Trash

Climbing Gear and Knots

Slings, draws, cordelletes, etc.: Cover options and their applications.
Review rope construction and application, dynamic vs. static. Cover rope care, management; coiling and stacking.
For rope: Figure of eight follow through, Figure of eight on a bight and the Clove Hitch. Girth Hitch and Double Fisherman’s for cord and slings.

Alpine/Big Mountain Climbing Curriculum

Introduction to use of carabiners, knots, slings, ropes.
Adjusting harness and helmet.
Use of Ascender / Figure of 8 and managing fixed lines.
Tying into rope, belaying techniques and communication.
Moving on rock and/or snow with and without crampons.
Movement as a rope team- running belays, belayed pitches.
Cleaning and racking protection.
Managing the ice axe on technical terrain.

Belaying

Tying in and anchoring
Positioned away from falling objects
Demonstrate and practice the hip belay and harness/device techniques
Climbing signals
With and without gloves
Lowering the climber with two hands on the brake
Climber and belayer safety check

Use of Avalanche Transceivers
Digital transceiver functions
Probes and shovels.
Review methods of attachment and use.
Demonstrate and practice signal, coarse, fine and pinpoint search methods.

The Ice Axe

Anatomy of an ice axe
Leashes: Initiate conversation about the use of the leash and its pros and cons.
Carrying positions
1) When not in use
2) When attached to a pack
3) When in use – pick orientation in relation to slope

Ice Axe (Piolet Positions)
Pick forward (Piolet Panne)
Walking (Piolet Marche)
“Duck walk” (Pied en Canard)
Cross over step (Pied a Plat)
Self anchor (Piolet Manche)
One foot flat, one foot on front points (pied troiseme [a.k.a. American Technique])
Piolet Panne – low dagger position.
Turning switchbacks

Descending on snow

Plunge step
Diagonal plunge step
Face in downclimbing –The same as piolet manche but downclimbing
Controlled glissade

Day 2 Schedule: Putting Your Skills into Action

We also want to put all the above skills into practice so on the second day of this mountaineering course. You will review all climbing knots, belaying and rappelling. It is really important to get to grips with moving between fixed lines using safety lines and rappelling using a figure of 8. Climb the 1st or the 3rd Flatiron or something comparable in Eldorado Canyon State Park.
Colorado Mountain training

What You Need to Bring With you

You can rent harness, climbing shoes, helmet, belay/rappel device and Jumar. We encouraged you to bring your own equipment. You will need to bring two liters of water, food/snacks, midsize (30/35 liter or so) backpack, sneakers/lightweight hiking boots, clothes for weather from hot to cold, sunscreen, sunglasses. We will provide a detailed kit list on signing up.

We will work with you making sure you are fully prepared for your next adventure and you will be given information and further training and preparation you will need to make. Our goal is to help you becoming more confident and self sufficient in your mountaineering ability. Learn about rope work, using an Ice axe, scrambling, knots, Jumar, rappelling on a figure of 8, moving on snow, mountaineering techniques and physical preparation.

Rock Climbing in Colorado

What You Need to Bring With you

You can rent harness, climbing shoes, helmet, belay/rappel device and Jumar. We encouraged you to bring your own equipment. You will need to bring two liters of water, food/snacks, midsize (30/35 liter or so) backpack, sneakers/lightweight hiking boots, clothes for weather from hot to cold, sunscreen, sunglasses. We will provide a detailed kit list on signing up.

We will work with you making sure you are fully prepared for your next adventure and you will be given information and further training and preparation you will need to make. Our goal is to help you becoming more confident and self sufficient in your mountaineering ability. Learn about rope work, using an Ice axe, scrambling, knots, Jumar, rappelling on a figure of 8, moving on snow, mountaineering techniques and physical preparation.

Looking off Quandary Peak Colorado

Contact The Experts

We offer highly professional and experienced guides making sure you are ready for your Alpine, Himalayan or South American Climb. Contact us for further information.  We can help maximize your experience so you can launch your mountaineering potential. Our Mountaineering training in Colorado is for everyone looking to get started and be safe in the mountains.